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Jamaica Court at the World's Exposition (1885)

JAMAICA.

Note. — No article enumerated in this catalogue is for sale until after the close of the Exposition. Persons desirous of purchasing any special exhibit or class of exhibits then, should leave their orders with the attendant in charge.

Jamaica is the largest and most valuable of the West India Islands belonging to Great Britain, and it has been termed "one of the brightest jewels in the British crown." Its greatest length is 144 miles, its greatest breadth 49 miles, and it contains 4,200 square miles.

As regards New Orleans, Jamaica is the nearest (1,000 miles) of all the British West India Islands, and Kingston, the capital (40,000 inhabitants), is within four days' sail of the southern states of America.

The value of the exports is $7,750,000; of the imports, $6,610,000; and the annual revenue is $i,725,000. The chief exports in order of importance, with their annual value, are as follows: Sugar, $1,260,000; rum, $1,130,000; tropical fruits, $1,370,000; coffee, $803,500; pimento, $564,000; dyewoods, $500,000; ginger, $90,000; cacao, $50,000; beeswax and honey, $30,000; and lancewood spars, $25,000. As regards distribution of trade, the produce of the island shipped in 1884 was as follows: United Kingdom, 46.3 per cent; Dominion of Canada, 14.7 per cent; United States of America, 32 per cent; all other countries, 7 per cent.

The surface of the island is greatly diversified, and hence it affords means for the cultivation of most economic tropical plants from sea-level to an elevation of 7,000 feet. Cattle and horse raising are important industries on the northern slopes of the island where the nutritious Guinea grass affords excellent pasture all the year round.

The climate of Jamaica is superior to that of any of the West India Islands, and in the hills, especially, at moderate elevation, it is recommended as eminently suitable to northern people obliged to seek a mild health resort during the winter months.

The population of Jamaica, by last census, was 580,000, being an increase of 73,650 during the previous ten years. Of these there are: whites, 14,432; colored, 109,946; black, 444,186; the remainder being Coolies and Chinese.

The government is administered by a governor, appointed by the British crown, assisted by a legislative council composed of nominated and elected members, the latter having a majority.

Fuller information respecting Jamaica may be obtained from a pamphlet let entitled "Jamaica at the World's Exposition," prepared by the governors of the Institute of Jamaica, which may be obtained free of cost at the Jamaica Court, Post H, 15 Main Building. The "Hand-book of Jamaica," an octavo volume of 500 pages, published annually, under the auspices of the government, is a most complete repository of everything connected with the island. The volume for 1884-85, published by Edward Stanford, 53 Charing Cross, London, may be obtained in New Orleans. Price $2.

I. — SUGAR.

The export of sugar from Jamaica in 1883 was 30,784 tons, ot the value of $1,260,000. This, combined with rum, renders the produce of the Kugar cane the staple industry of the island. The general depression in the price of sugar is felt in Jamaica as in all sugar-producing countries. Owing to the sugar crop being reaped chiefly in the earlier months of the year, the samples sent to the New Orleans Exposition (in November) are few in number but fairly represent the best qualities of sugars produced in Jamaica:

1. Vacuum pan sugar, white, Albion Estate, Major Carson.
2. Vacuum pan. No. 2, Albion Estate, Major Carson.
3. Vacuum pan sugar, straw, Ewing's Caymanas, J. Crum-Ewing.
4. Vacuum pan sugar, yellow, Ewing's Caymanas, J. Crum-Ewing.
5. Vacuum pan sugar, white, Bushy Park, Louis Verley.
6. Vacuum pan sugar, yellow. Bushy Park, Louis Verley.
7. Centrifugal sugar, straw, Mona Estate, Louis Verley.
8. Muscovado sugar, yellow, Whitney Estate, E. C. Elliott.
9. Muscovado sugar, yellow, Greenock Estate, J. Weir Anderson.

II — RUM.

Jamaica rum is exported to the extent of 2,008,565 gallons, of the value of $1,130,000. This staple industry occupies so prominent a position and is so widely known that it is needless to enlarge upon it. The exhibits include all the finest and best brands produced in the island and embrace estates and merchants' rums of acknowledged excellence.

(A.) Estates' Rum.

10. Rum crop, 1882, Appleton Estate, W. D. Hill.
11. Rum crop, 1883, Appleton Estate, W. D. Hill.
12. Rum crop, 1884, Appleton Estate, W. D. Hill.
13. Rum crop, 1879 (reduced). Vale Royal, H. Sewell.
14. Rum crop, 1883 (over proof). Vale Royal, H. Sewell.
15. Rum crop, 1884 (over proof). Vale Royal, H. Sewell.
16. Rum crop, 1874, Orange Valley Estate, William Kerr.
17. Rum crop, 1884, Golden Grove Estate, William Kerr.
18. Rum crop, 1884, Kent Estate, William Kerr.
19. Rum crop, 1884, Tilston Estate, William Kerr.
20. Rum crop, 1884, Guilsboro' Estate, William Kerr.
21. Rum crop, 1884, Gales Valley Estate, William Kerr.
22. Rum crop, 1874, Seville Estate, J. E. P. Thompson.
23. Rum crop, 1884, Seville Estate, J. E. P. Thompson.
24. Rum crop, 1884 (white), Seville Estate, J. E. P. Thompson.
25. Rum crop, 1884, Mona Estate, Louis Verley.
26. Rum crop, 1884, Bushy Park, Louis Verley.
27. Rum crop, 1884, (white), Bushy Park, Louis Verley.
28. Rum crop, 1884, Tullock Estate, J. McPhail.
29. Rum crop, 1884 (white), Tullock Estate, J. McPhail.
30. Rum crop, 1884, Whitney Estate, E. C. Elliott.
31. Rum crop, 1884 (white), Whitney Estate, E. C. Elliott.
32. Rum crop, old, Whitney Estate, E. C. Elliott.
33. Rum crop (table), Whitney Estate, E. C. Elliott.
34. Rum crop, 1884, Elim Estate, W. H. Farquharson.
35. Rum crop, 1884 (table), Elim Estate, W. H. Farquharson.
36. Rum crop, 1884, Greenock Estate, J. Weir Anderson.
37. Rum crop, 1884 (white), Greenock Estate, J. Weir Anderson.
38. Rum crop, 1883, Constant Spring, M. C. Morgan.
39. Rum crop, 1883 (white). Constant Spring, M. C. Morgan.
40. Rum crop, 1854, Mona Estate, Louis Verley.
41. Rum crop, 1884, Dry River Estate, John Dingwall.

(B.) Merchants' Rum.

42. Old rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
43. Rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
44. Old Rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
45. Rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
46. White rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
47. Rum, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
48. Rum (V.A.), P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
49. Rum (over proof), P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
50. Rum (4 years old), P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
51. Rum (7 years old), P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
52. Old rum (No. i), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
53. Old rum (No. 2), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
54. Old rum (No. 3), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
55. Old rum (No. 4), Wtslv & Nephew, Kingston.
56. Old rum (No. 5), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
57. Old rum (No. 6), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
58. Old rum (30 years old), D. Finzi & Co., Kingson.
59. Old bottled rum (2), D. Finzi & Co., Kingston.
60. Old rum (30 years), D. Finzi & Co., Kingston.
61. Old vatted rum, D. Finzi & Co., Kingston.
62. Fine old vatted rum (3), D. Finzi & Co., Kingston.
63. White rum (old, 2), D. Finzi & Co., Kingston.
64. Rum crop, 1883, George & Branday, Kingston.
65. Rum crop, 1882, George & Branday, Kingston.
66. Old rum, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
67. Colored rum, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
68. White rum, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.

III — LIQUEURS, CORDIALS, Etc.

69. White ginger wine, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
70. White orange wine, Simon & Le Ray, Kingson.
71. Peppermint wine, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
72. Prune bark wine, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
73. White ginger cordial, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
74. Pimento cordial, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
75. Orange cordial, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
76. White orange cordial, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
77. Prune bark cordial, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
78. Cordial bitters, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
79. Aromatic bitters, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
80. Rum shrub, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
81. Milk punch, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
82. Creme de Macaron, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
83. Parfait amour, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
84. Peppermint cordials, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
85. Creme de Noyeau, Simon & Le ray, Kingston.
86. Liqueure de oro, Simon & Le Ray, Kingston.
87. Pimento dram, Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
88. Ginger wine, Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
89. Rum shrub, Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
90. Stomachic bitters, Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
91. Orange wine (two), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
92. Ginger wine (colored), Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
93. Prune dram, Wray & Nephew, Kingston.
94. Orange wine (two), P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
95. Ginger wine, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
96. Creme de Noyeau, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
97. Pimento dram, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
98. Stomachic bitters, P. Desnoes & Son, Kingston.
99. Ginger wine, W. D. Hill, Appleton.
100. Orange wine, W. D. Hill, Appleton.
101. Pimento dram, E. C. Elliott, Vere.
102. Aromatic bitters (four), H. W. Cody & Co., Kingston.
103. Aromatic bitters, A. C. MacMillan, Kingston.
104. Pimento cordial, A. C. MacMillan, Kingston.
105. Ginger wine, A. C. MacMillan, Kingston.
106. Quinine cordial bitters (two), J. Phillips, Falmouth.
107. Simaruba bitters, J. Hart, Gordon Town.